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NADIS Parasite Forecast October 2016

NADIS Parasite Forecast and Video Case Study October 2016 Liver Fluke treatments and forecast for cattle and sheep and housing treatments for cattle

NADIS publishes a monthly Parasite Forecast for farmers and livestock keepers, based on detailed Met Office data. The Parasite Forecast outlines the parasitic challenges facing cattle and sheep in the different UK regions.

Nadis Parasite Forecast

Webinar October

Video Case Study

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Sales see Texels in demand as records tumble

This year’s round of National Texel Sales in Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England have seen a number of new records set for the breed with the sales continuing to deliver sustained growth for Society members.

At the Scottish National Sale, Lanark, the breed delivered a new all-time gross sale record, with the two day fixture resulting in a total of £1,081,668 being spent on the best genetics the breed has to offer.

Both pedigree and commercial buyers were equally active at Lanark, with plenty of ram lambs sold in the 400gns-1000gns to commercial buyers looking for well grown, naturally fleshed rams, explained Society chairman David McKerrow.

“Additionally, this sale also saw a record ram lamb average, with 351 sold to level at £2812.24. The breed continues to deliver what the commercial market place wants and that in turn is giving pedigree breeders the confidence to invest in the future of their flocks by seeking out the latest genetics available,” he explained.

Meanwhile, the English National Sale, Worcester, saw a new centre gimmer record set at 16,000gns, with a record average for gimmers too at £993.45. “This exceptional average came on the back of a sale which delivered an 86% clearance rate for the gimmers offered, with a number of new breeders establishing flocks from the gimmers available,” said Mr McKerrow.

It is clear the Texel breed continues to attract interest from new breeders attracted by he clear and increasing commercial demand for Texel rams capable of producing premium lambs, he added.

Ram lamb averages rose at all National sales, with just shy of 800 ram lambs finding buyers across the four sales in the space of 14 days, explained Society chief executive John Yates.

“This insatiable demand for Texel genetics is driven by commercial producers seeking out the breed for both its terminal and maternal qualities.

“The ongoing breed development including extensive use of performance recording and development of genomic technologies places the breed at the forefront of genetic improvement in the UK sheep industry helping deliver added value to commercial producers,” he said.

“Feedback from across the UK is that Texels continue to be the number one choice sire for commercial flocks no matter what the dam breed or the system.”

The breed also enjoyed another exceptional year at last week’s Kelso Ram Sale, with 870 shearlings selling to average £878.44, a rise of more than £110 on the year, while 101 ram lambs averaged £643.76.

“Texels continue to extend their influence across the UK industry and deliver what modern commercial sheep producers require,” added Mr Yates.

With a number of local Club sales as well as next week’s NSA main ram sale at Builth still to come Mr Yates said commercial buyers had plenty of opportunity to buy Texel sires to suit their needs.

“Builth alone has an entry of more than 1200 registered Texel rams, giving buyers plenty of quality to pick from to find rams to add value to next year’s lamb crop.”

 

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New ewe lamb competition at East of England Smithfield Festival

This year's East of England Smithfield Festival, Peterborough, on 15th and 16th November will see a new breeding ewe lamb competition added to the schedule, including classes for purebred and crossbred, native and continental breeds. The champions from this new class will be offered for sale at the event.

The College Challenge will also make a return this year and will see teams from agricultural colleges around the UK compete for this prestigious title. This will also be judged by Martin Irvine, together with NFU livestock board chairman, Charles Sercombe.  The College Challenge is predominately a stock judging competition, but also includes feed raw material identification and silage sample analysis.  This class proved incredibly popular in 2015.

As promised, the Smithfield Festival continues to listen to the industry and change the format for new demands, says William Haire, festival show director. “The new classes reflect the changing face of the industry."

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NADIS Parasite Forecast September 2016

NADIS Parasite Forecast and Video Case Study September 2016 - Liver Fluke, Quarantine Purchased Sheep, Worms in Lambs and Gut and Lungworm in Cattle.

NADIS publishes a monthly Parasite Forecast for farmers and livestock keepers, based on detailed Met Office data. The Parasite Forecast outlines the parasitic challenges facing cattle and sheep in the different UK regions.

 

Click on the links below to view:

NADIS Parasite Forecast

Webinar September Parasite Forecast

Video Case Study

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NADIS Parasite Forecast August 2016

NADIS Parasite Forecast and Video Case Study August 2016 - Worms in lambs and rams, fly control in sheep and worms and lungworm in cattle.

NADIS publishes a monthly Parasite Forecast for farmers and livestock keepers, based on detailed Met Office data. The Parasite Forecast outlines the parasitic challenges facing cattle and sheep in the different UK regions.

Click on the links below to view

NADIS Parasite Forecast

Webinar - Parasite Forecast August 2016

Video Case Study

 

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National Texel sales offer added value rams

This year’s round of National Texel Sales in England, Scotland and Wales offer an unprecedented chance for both pedigree and commercial buyers to source rams with top genetics capable of adding significant value to next year’s lamb crop.

Large numbers of performance recorded rams from some of the breed’s leading flocks will be on offer at all three of the mainland GB national sales, with many also carrying breed leading genetics for key traits such as growth rate and muscle depth.

Texel Sheep Society chairman David McKerrow said commercial demand for the breed underpinned these major sales with the top end pedigree demand the icing on the cake for the breed.

“As breeders our members have long recognised the need to produce commercially relevant, fit for purpose sheep suited to the commercial sector. Indeed over the last 42 years since the breed was imported to the UK it has been the breed’s commercial attributes which have seen it rise to be the number one sire in the country.

“Easy fleshing, quick growing lambs with consistent quality carcasses are what draws buyers back year after year and the feedback from commercial producers is that no other breed can match the Texel for these key attributes,” he added.

Mr McKerrow said that buyers attending the National Sales at Lanark, Welshpool and Worcester, could be assured of finding rams to suit them from across the UK. “The great thing about the Texel breed is the adaptability of it to a wide range of farming systems and climatic conditions.

“Wherever you go in the UK you’ll find Texel sired lambs thriving and often producing the leading prices in local markets. The strong maternal characteristics of the breed have also made it popular among commercial farmers, with more than 12.5% of the national flock now being Texel sired ewes.”

Importantly, he added, recent research has shown that using pedigree Texel rams can significantly increase margins compared to using non-pedigree Texels.

The research, undertaken by Tim Byrne, Peter Amer and Tom Kirk of AbacusBio found that using a pedigree Texel ram as opposed to a commercially produced one is worth more than £100 a ram over a four year working life.

“On top of this using a performance recorded Texel ram as opposed to a non-recorded ram adds more than £250 a ram to a commercial producer’s bottom line over a four year working life, significantly increasing the income a flock can generate.”

“Using better rams of known performance and breeding is clearly one way of lifting income in these uncertain times. A performance recorded, pedigree Texel ram could add more than £350 to the value of his progeny over a four year working life.”

The continued genetic improvement in the pedigree and performance recorded Texel populations is unmatched in non-pedigree breeding and commercial buyers can come to the National Texel sales assured of buying rams of known performance and pedigree, said Mr McKerrow.

Once again this year’s Scottish National Texel Sale at Lanark on Wednesday 24 August and Thursday 25 August will be streamed live via the Texel Society’s website for those unable to make the sale, said Texel Society chief executive John Yates.

“This popular service is now in its fifth year with viewers from across the globe tuning in last year to catch up on the sale as it progressed. We have a large Texel community across the UK and further afield many of whom are unable to attend the sale due to other commitments, by streaming the sale live they are able to keep up with all the action as it happens.

“The Society has previously streamed the sale of shearling rams and ram lambs, with the gimmer sale on Wednesday evening  added this year for the first time,” he added.

The Scottish National Sale takes place at Lanark on 24 and 25 August, the Welsh National Sale takes place at Welshpool on 27 August and the English National Sale takes place at Worcester on 29 and 30 August.

To view and download catalogues for all the National Sales see the sales page of this website

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Texel rams add value to commercial flocks

Using pedigree Texel rams can significantly increase margins compared to using non-pedigree Texels, according to recent research.

The research, undertaken by Tim Byrne, Peter Amer and Tom Kirk of AbacusBio found that using a pedigree Texel ram as opposed to a commercially produced one is worth more than £100 a ram over a four year working life, explained Texel Sheep Society chief executive John Yates.

“On top of this using a performance recorded Texel ram as opposed to a non-recorded ram adds more than £250 a ram to a commercial producer’s bottom line over a four year working life, significantly increasing the income a flock can generate.

“Indeed, with about 100,000 Texel rams being used every year in the GB sheep industry, the total annual benefit could be more than £6m across the industry and when adding together the benefits of using a pedigree ram and a performance recorded pedigree ram the cumulative benefit is as much as £10m a year across the industry,” explained Mr Yates.

At a time when commercial producers are seeking reassurance and stability in the wake of political and economic uncertainty the benefits of using pedigree, performance recorded Texel rams are not to be ignored, he added. “Adding value to commercial sheep enterprises is never easy.

“However, making a simple change to using better rams of known performance and breeding is clearly one way of lifting income. A performance recorded, pedigree Texel ram could add more than £350 to the value of his progeny over a four year working life.”

Mr Yates said the added benefits came about as a result of continued genetic improvement in the pedigree and performance recorded Texel populations which was unmatched in non-pedigree breeding.

“The commitment to breed improvement shown by Texel breeders over more than 40 years has seen the breed rise from nothing to become the leading terminal sire in the UK, while also contributing significantly to the national flock, with more than 12.5% of ewes in the UK being Texel sired.”

The growing influence of the Texel breed as a sire of female replacements gives commercial producers another opportunity to profit from the breed, with its maternal qualities now becoming equally as well recognised as its terminal attributes, said Mr Yates.

“The future may be uncertain, but there is no doubt that the demand for high quality lamb, both domestically and internationally, means the role of the Texel breed is only set to grow. Texel breeders are committed to developing the breed further to suit the needs of the modern sheep producer and the Society’s work on genomics and performance recording is providing breeders with the tools to develop the breed at a faster pace than ever before.”

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Recorded rams the focus at North West event

Commercial and pedigree sheep farmers in the north west of England and south west Scotland will have the chance to learn more about how using performance recorded rams could help their flocks at an event hosted by the Case family’s Nab Point Texel flock.

The open afternoon at Plumpton Cottage Farm, Newland, Ulverston, on Monday 1st August was conceived as a way of helping local commercial customers understand more about EBVs and how they can use them in their ram selection, explains Will Case.

“We’ve been recording for three years now and are seeing a growing interest among our customers for recorded rams. However, like many things there is a lot to understand when it comes to performance recording and I myself am still learning about it. I felt it was important to help potential customers learn from the experts.

“Sam Boon of Signet will be attending the event to give an overview of recording and explain the system and how the indices produced can help commercial buyers produce lambs more efficiently and to the desired specification.”

In his own situation running a large commercial flock alongside the pedigree Texel flock and beef and dairy enterprises, Mr Case says he has learnt a lot about his flock from recording. “Its great to get another insight in to how the flock is performing and without a doubt EBVs are proving to be a useful selection tool for us.

“We use our own Texel rams in the commercial flock each year and having chatted to a few long-term recorders we’re not looking closely at fat cover and using rams with positive fat indexes to encourage easier fleshing in our crossbred lambs.”

Mr Case says with much uncertainty in the sheep sector at the moment aiming to produce sheep with lower feed inputs has to be on the agenda for most producers. “That’s not to say we shouldn’t feed at all as every situation is different, but if we can produce more sheep from less feed that has to be a good thing for our businesses.”

Staring at 2pm the open afternoon will give visitors the chance to see this year’s selection of shearling rams from the Nab Point flock as well as the flock’s crop of gimmers.

For more information and to register for the event see the AHDB Beef and Lamb website.

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Balcony adds to Royal Welsh Texel experience

Support from the Texel Sheep Society for the Royal Welsh Show’s sheep shed balcony development has resulted in an excellent addition to the viewing facilities at the show, with Society members and guests enjoying an unrivalled view of the Texel judging on Monday afternoon at the show and of the interbreed judging later in the week.

The Society’s support of the development allowed two bays to be opened up, with other sponsors also contributing to the development and ensuring the entire length of the balcony was turned in to a viewing platform over the judging rings.

Texel breeders James and Trudy Davies said the balcony had been a superb addition to the show facilities and the Society was to be applauded for helping with it. “Its been a welcome spot in a particularly hot show week, offering some shelter and shade as well as providing a great spot to watch the judging. Its been so popular a huge number of people from other breeds have also been making use of it too!

“Importantly everyone has been made to feel welcome and the girls providing drinks and refreshments have absolutely worked their socks off to keep everyone refreshed throughout the show, but particularly on Monday afternoon during judging when the temperatures were extremely hot.”

See the full Royal Welsh results here

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Consider Bluetongue vaccination ahead of ram sales

Breeders are being urged to consider Bluetongue vaccination well in advance of the upcoming ram sales in case the virus enters the UK during the peak ram selling season resulting in only vaccinated, disease resistanct animals being able to leave disease control zones.

At a meeting of the NSA Wales and Border Ram Sales committee the committee heard from NSA chief executive Phil Stocker who said: "With Bluetongue still being predicted as having an 80% chance of reaching the UK in the late summer/autumn there was much discussion about vaccination and movement restrictions in the event of the virus being found here in the UK. Once of the most important points raised was that if farmers want to avoid any disruption to ram movements and sales, having decided to vaccinate, they should do so early because if an outbreak were to occur it will lead to a situation which allowss only vaccinated animals which have developed immunity to the virus being allowed to move from whatever zones may be put in place. It is in everyone's interest to do what we can to avoid disruption in movements and trade.

"NSA understands that vaccine will be available imminently and advises sheep farmers to speak to their vets for more information at the earliest opportunity," he added.

Texel Sheep Society chief executive John Yates said Texel breeders would be well advised to discuss vaccination with their vets and take the best possible advice with regards protecting their stock in advance of any potential Bluetongue outbreak in the UK. "The potential disruption to trade and movements resulting from a Bluetongue outbreak is significant and anything which can be done to minimise this disruption should be considered."

 

 

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